Barbie Swiss Army knife


Empower young girls to expand their horizons beyond playing with stereotypical gender reinforcing toys by combining a everyone’s favorite pink girl-centric doll with something a little stabby.

A multi-tool is hidden inside the torso of the Barbie, where the blades can be pulled out from a slit in her side. The body also separates at the waist to reveal a screwdriver hidden in the legs. The two halves of this doll are connected by magnets, so she holds together when fully assembled. Barbie never looked so good!

I doubt these are actually particularly safe for kids—a knife mounted in a doll’s abdomen is probably a bit less stable (and therefore more dangerous) than the knife alone, but it’s so darn cute and creepy, I may just have to make one to keep in my purse. You know… for protection.

Read more at Dangerous Minds


OMG Via Cacciatore

The Ridge is the brand new film from Danny Macaskill... For the first time in one of his films Danny climbs aboard a mountain bike and returns to his native home of the Isle of Skye in Scotland to take on a death-defying ride along the notorious Cuillin Ridgeline.

Sigiriya Frescoes

Hidden in a cave along the citadel at Sigiriya are some of the most magnificent ancient frescoes in South Asia.



Halfway on Sigiriya-rock, you can see very special mural paintings. They are non-religious representations of women, of which some have been preserved very well. Some sources even say that the whole western face of the rock used to be covered with these paintings (of 500 women). 


John Still in 1907 suggested, "The whole face of the hill appears to have been a gigantic picture gallery... the largest picture in the world perhaps". The paintings would have covered most of the western face of the rock, an area 140 metres long and 40 metres high. There are references in the graffiti to 500 ladies in these paintings. However, most have been lost forever. More frescoes, different from those on the rock face, can be seen elsewhere, for example on the ceiling of the location called the "Cobra Hood Cave".




Although the frescoes are classified as in the Anuradhapura period, the painting style is considered unique; the line and style of application of the paintings differing from Anuradhapura paintings. The lines are painted in a form which enhances the sense of volume of the figures. The paint has been applied in sweeping strokes, using more pressure on one side, giving the effect of a deeper colour tone towards the edge. Other paintings of the Anuradhapura period contain similar approaches to painting, but do not have the sketchy lines of the Sigiriya style, having a distinct artists' boundary line. The true identity of the ladies in these paintings still have not been confirmed. There are various ideas about their identity. Some believe that they are the wives of the king while some think that they are women taking part in religious observances. These pictures have a close resemblance to some of the paintings seen in the Ajanta caves in India

New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function [via Nina Reznick]

 

Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques - structures that are responsible for memory loss and a decline in cognitive function in Alzheimer’s patients.

If a person has Alzheimer’s disease, it’s usually the result of a build-up of two types of lesions - amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Amyloid plaques sit between the neurons and end up as dense clusters of beta-amyloid molecules, a sticky type of protein that clumps together and forms plaques.

Neurofibrillary tangles are found inside the neurons of the brain, and they’re caused by defective tau proteins that clump up into a thick, insoluble mass. This causes tiny filaments called microtubules to get all twisted, which disrupts the transportation of essential materials such as nutrients and organelles along them, just like when you twist up the vacuum cleaner tube.

As we don’t have any kind of vaccine or preventative measure for Alzheimer’s - a disease that affects 343,000 people in Australia, and 50 million worldwide - it’s been a race to figure out how best to treat it, starting with how to clear the build-up of defective beta-amyloid and tau proteins from a patient’s brain. Now a team from the Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) at the University of Queensland have come up with a pretty promising solution for removing the former.

Publishing in Science Translational Medicine, the team describes the technique as using a particular type of ultrasound called a focused therapeutic ultrasound, which non-invasively beams sound waves into the brain tissue. By oscillating super-fast, these sound waves are able to gently open up the blood-brain barrier, which is a layer that protects the brain against bacteria, and stimulate the brain’s microglial cells to activate. Microglila cells are basically waste-removal cells, so they’re able to clear out the toxic beta-amyloid clumps that are responsible for the worst symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

The team reports fully restoring the memory function of 75 percent of the mice they tested it on, with zero damage to the surrounding brain tissue. They found that the treated mice displayed improved performance in three memory tasks - a maze, a test to get them to recognise new objects, and one to get them to remember the places they should avoid.

"We’re extremely excited by this innovation of treating Alzheimer’s without using drug therapeutics," one of the team, Jürgen Götz, said in a press release. "The word ‘breakthrough’ is often misused, but in this case I think this really does fundamentally change our understanding of how to treat this disease, and I foresee a great future for this approach."

The team says they’re planning on starting trials with higher animal models, such as sheep, and hope to get their human trials underway in 2017.

You can hear an ABC radio interview with the team here

Got any old cars you don't want?



You have got to see this Car Grinder. This mechanical monster is evidently replacing the car crusher.  Remember those big loads of flattened cars on 18 wheelers going down the highway? May be a thing of the past.

This sucker even grinds up engine blocks. I don't know what powers it, but there has to be a lot of ratio gearing to keep it moving. It reverses now and then to clear the hard core debris that gets stuck.

TRULY AMAZING [Via Nina Reznick]

I Want These Teeth! [via Nina Reznick]

Limpet teeth are the strongest biological material known to man

The teeth were so hard that a diamond saw had to be used to slice them

Forget spiders' webs; the teeth of tiny limpets are the strongest biological material yet discovered, and could be used to build the cars, boats and planes of the future. And their sheer strength could see them become the basis for a new generation of virtually unbreakable false teeth, according to researchers from the University of Portsmouth.

Read More 


These Trees Have Secret Native American Codes. Their Meaning? Brilliant! [via Nina Reznick]

Have you ever been walking through the woods and noticed an oddly shaped tree? These trees, totally inconspicuous save for their strange shapes, have a very special place in America’s history — and serve a fascinating purpose! Over 100 years ago, these trees were purposefully bent, and their odd shapes communicate very important messages.



In order to live and work efficiently, these tribes needed a way to navigate their land and communicate with one another. Called "marker trees," or "trail trees," saplings were carefully bent by a local Native American tribe, forcing them to grow in unnatural shapes. Like highway exit signs, these trees would have pointed tribes people to water sources, medicinal plants, and special burial sites.


These formations communicated a special message to the tribe members.
The shapes of the trees varied depending upon the tribe and the message being relayed. 


Later, European settlers would often use these trail markers for guidance to the same resources: fresh water, mineral deposits, and safe-crossing points.

This tree stands upon a geographical divide, said to mark the boundary between two local tribes. Hence the reason it points in opposite directions.




David Zinn's whimsical small-scale cartoon street art in Ann Arbor, MI via Nina Reznick

David Zinn is a Michigan artist who works with chalks on the streets of Ann Arbor. His most famous creation is Sluggo, a little monster with a green body and long, round eyes.










Homeless Man Plays Piano Beautifully

Makes you wonder where does this bring him back to?

More I'll Take the Stairs [via David Angsten]

Staircase at the Natural History Museum in London
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Chand Baori stepwell in India
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Double spiral stairs at the Vatican Museum
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Stairs in a Portuguese Bookstore
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Back in 1906 when the store first opened
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Melk Abbey in Austria
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Most likely the longest mosaic stairs in San Francisco
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Sculpture that looks like you can walk into the sky by artist David McCracken in Australia
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Groninger Museum in the Netherlands
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Ice Hotel stairs
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In Edinburgh, the Dovecot Studio specializes in tapestries and has these woven stairs
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A walking roller coaster in Germany
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Spiral stairs at the Quinta da Regaleira in Portugal
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Nevermind, I don't want to take the stairs


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