Interesting Historical Photographs [via David Angsten]


A lion rides in the sidecar during a performance of The Wall of Death carnival attraction at Revere Beach, Massachusetts in 1929.



An iceberg photographed in 1912 bearing an unmistakable mark of black and red paint.  It is believed that this is the iceberg that sank the Titanic.



Betty White at home with her dog in 1952


Children for sale in Chicago, 1948.  Some parents sold their children due to poverty.


Incredible Photos [via Cacciatore]

 The Internal Mechanism of a Watch by Patek Philippe, Considered the Finest Watchmaker in the World
Sunset and Eclipse Happening at the Same Time

Algodones Sand Dunes Curvy Border Fence in Southern California

Perfect Cubes of Pyrite Formed by Mother Nature

 Melted Glass in a Fire Damaged Building

World's Deepest Swimming Pool - 113 Ft. Deep and Holding 600,000 Gallons

Path-Laying Machine

A battery you never have to replace [via Nina Reznick]



Top: Schematic diagram of all-nanowire-based capacitor (similar to a battery), using gold-manganese dioxide conductors and PMMA gel layer. Bottom: photograph of the capacitor containing 750 parallel nanowire loops patterned onto a glass microscope slide. (credit: Mya Le Thai/ACS Energy Lett.)

New nanowire-based battery material can be recharged hundreds of thousands of times
University of California, Irvine researchers have invented a new nanowire-based battery material that can be recharged hundreds of thousands of times, moving us closer to a battery that would never require replacement.

It could lead to commercial batteries with greatly lengthened lifespans for computers, smartphones, appliances, cars, and spacecraft.

The design is based on nanowires, which are highly conductive and feature a large surface area for the storage and transfer of electrons.

Currently, nanowires are extremely fragile and don’t hold up well to repeated discharging and recharging (cycling). In a typical lithium-ion battery, they expand and grow brittle, which leads to cracking.

UCI researchers have solved this problem by coating a gold nanowire in a manganese dioxide shell and encasing the assembly in an electrolyte made of a Plexiglas-like gel. The liquid electrolyte is replaced with a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) gel electrolyte. The combination is reliable and resistant to failure.

The study leader, UCI doctoral candidate Mya Le Thai, cycled the testing electrode up to 200,000 times over three months without detecting any loss of capacity or power and without fracturing any nanowires. The findings were published Wednesday Apr. 20 in an open-access paper in the American Chemical Society’s Energy Letters.

“Mya was playing around, and she coated this whole thing with a very thin gel layer and started to cycle it,” said senior author Reginald Penner, chair of UCI’s chemistry department. “She discovered that just by using this gel, she could cycle it hundreds of thousands of times without losing any capacity. That was crazy, because these things typically die in dramatic fashion after 5,000 or 6,000 or 7,000 cycles at most.”

The researchers think the gel plasticizes the metal oxide in the battery and gives it flexibility, preventing cracking.

“The coated electrode holds its shape much better, making it a more reliable option,” Thai said. “This research proves that a nanowire-based battery electrode can have a long lifetime and that we can make these kinds of batteries a reality.”

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Yet another example of things being faster; smaller; longer; older; larger than originally thought.

In the late 1990s, archeologist Francois Rouzaud used carbon dating to estimate a chamber in the Bruniquel Cave in France to be around 47,000 years old. This was news because it meant that the cave sculpture was older than the oldest known cave art, and more importantly it meant that the chances it was created by Neanderthals as opposed to Homo sapiens was very high. This would be, arguably, the most powerful evidence at the time that Neanderthals were much more sophisticated than had been previously believed.



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More Magnificent Libraries of the World [via Cacciatore]

 
 Library of the Benedictine Monastery, Admont, Austria


 
 library of El Escorial Monastery , Madrid, Spain


 
 National Library of Finland in Helsinki



 Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, Toronto, Canada


 George Peabody Library, Baltimore, Maryland

 


 
University of Coimbra General Library, Coimbra, Portugal.

Magnificent Libraries of the World [via Cacciatore]



 
The Morgan Library & Museum, NY, USA




  Library of Parliament, Ottawa, Canada


 
 
 Yale University Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, New Haven, CT


 
Hall of legal literature of the Public Library of Iowa City, USA

 
 Suzzallo Library at the University of Washington

Where the Bloomsbury Group/Set Chilled...

In the summer of 1916, Virginia Woolf urged her sister Venessa Bell to buy a farmhouse called "Charleston" in the Sussex Downs near Lewes. There, she, painters Duncan Grant, and Roger Fry devoted themselves to their own work and the complete redecoration of every surface of the house. "Charleston" became not only the aesthetic manifesto of the Bloomsbury Group but also the setting for the transition of their philosophy of life into physical action. All of the members of the Bloomsbury Group-including Virginia and Leonard Woolf were frequent houseguests.



"They really were the progressives and the embodiment of the avant-garde in early years of this century. Every time we look at them again they seem to have something for the contemporary world, whether in sexual ethics, liberation, biography, economics, feminism or painting."

— Michael Holroyd, in the San Francisco Chronicle, 1995



"It is a very fascinating, queer, self-absorbed, fantastic set of people. But they are very interesting..."
Ray Costelloe, in a letter to Mary Costelloe, 1909







Reposted From Identical Eye

20 Words We Owe to William Shakespeare



1. Addiction: Othello, Act II, Scene II

    “It is Othello's pleasure, our noble and valiant general, that, upon certain tidings now arrived, importing the mere perdition of the Turkish fleet, every man put himself into triumph; some to dance, some to make bonfires, each man to what sport and revels his addiction leads him.” – Herald

If not for that noble and valiant general and his playwright, our celebrity news coverage might be sorely lacking.


2. Arch-villain: Timon of Athens, Act V, Scene I

    “You that way and you this, but two in company; each man apart, all single and alone, yet an arch-villain keeps him company.” – Timon

With the added prefix of arch-, meaning more extreme than others of the same type, Shakespeare was able to distinguish the baddest of the bad.


3. Assassination: Macbeth, Act I, Scene VII


    “If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well it were done quickly: if the assassination could trammel up the consequence, and catch with his surcease success.” – Macbeth

Though the term “assassin” had been observed in use prior to the Scottish play, it seems apt that the work introduced yet another term for murder most foul.


4. Bedazzled: The Taming of the Shrew, Act IV, Scene V


    “Pardon, old father, my mistaking eyes, that have been so bedazzled with the sun that everything I look on seemeth green.” – Katherina

A word first used to describe the particular gleam of sunlight is now used to sell rhinestone-embellished jeans. Maybe poetry really is dead.


5. Belongings: Measure for Measure, Act I, Scene I

    “Thyself and thy belongings are not thine own so proper as to waste thyself upon thy virtues, they on thee.” – Duke Vincentio

People prior to Shakespeare’s time did own things; they just referred to them by different words.


6. Cold-blooded: King John, Act III, Scene I

    “Thou cold-blooded slave, hast thou not spoke like thunder on my side, been sworn my soldier, bidding me depend upon thy stars, thy fortune and thy strength, and dost thou now fall over to my fores?” – Constance

Beyond its literal meaning, the 17th-century play initiated a metaphorical use for the term that is now most often used to describe serial killers and vampires—two categories which, of course, need not be mutually exclusive.


7. Dishearten: Henry V, Act IV, Scene I

    “Therefore when he sees reason of fears, as we do, his fears, out of doubt, be of the same relish as ours are: yet, in reason, no man should possess him with any appearance of fear, lest he, by showing it, should dishearten his army.” – King Henry V

The opposite of “hearten,” a word already extant at the time of Shakespeare’s writing, “dishearten” was most appropriately first utilized in print by King Henry V, who didn’t let insurmountable odds at the Battle of Agincourt get him down.


8. Eventful: As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII

    “Last scene of all, that ends this strange eventful history, is second childishness and mere oblivion, sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.” - Jaques

If all the world’s a stage, it’s safe to assume that an event or two is taking place.


9. Eyeball: The Tempest, Act I, Scene II

    “Go make thyself like a nymph o' the sea: be subject to no sight but thine and mine, invisible to every eyeball else.” – Prospero

Shakespeare’s protagonist Prospero, though no medical doctor, can claim to be the first fictional character to name those round objects with which we see.


10. Fashionable: Troilus and Cressida, Act III, Scene III

    “For time is like a fashionable host that slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand, and with his arms outstretch'd, as he would fly, grasps in the comer: welcome ever smiles, and farewell goes out sighing.” – Ulysses

And with just 11 letters, centuries of debate over what’s hot or not began.


11. Half-blooded/hot-blooded: King Lear, Act V, Scene III/ Act III, Scene III

    “Half-blooded fellow, yes.” – Albany

    “Why, the hot-blooded France, that dowerless took our youngest born, I could as well be brought to knee his throne, and, squire-like; pension beg to keep base life afoot.” – Lear

As is the tradition in Shakespearean tragedy, nearly everyone in King Lear dies, so the linguistic fascination here with blood is unsurprising, to say the least.


12. Inaudible: All’s Well That Ends Well, Act V, Scene III

    “Let's take the instant by the forward top; for we are old, and on our quick'st decrees the inaudible and noiseless foot of Time steals ere we can effect them.” – King of France

One of a number of words (invulnerable, indistinguishable, inauspicious, among others) which Shakespeare invented only in the sense of adding a negative in- prefix where it had never been before.


13. Ladybird: Romeo and Juliet, Act I, Scene III

    “What, lamb! What, ladybird! God forbid! Where's this girl? What, Juliet!” – Nurse

Although the Oxford English Dictionary notes that this particular term of endearment has fallen into disuse, maybe it’s about time for its comeback. Valentine’s Day is coming up, after all.


14. Manager: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act V, Scene I

    “Where is our usual manager of mirth? What revels are in hand? Is there no play to ease the anguish of a torturing hour?” – King Theseus

If not for Shakespeare, workday complaining in the office break room just wouldn’t be the same.


15. Multitudinous: Macbeth, Act II, Scene II

    “No, this my hand will rather the multitudinous seas in incarnadine, making the green one red.” – Macbeth

“Multitudinous” may not be the most appropriate synonym when the phrase “a lot” starts to crop up too often in your writing, but it’s certainly the one with the most letters.


16. New-fangled: Love’s Labour’s Lost, Act I, Scene I

    “At Christmas I no more desire a rose than wish a snow in May's new-fangled mirth.” – Biron

Ironically, this word sounds old-fashioned if used today.


17. Pageantry: Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Act V, Scene II

    “This, my last boon, give me, for such kindness must relieve me, that you aptly will suppose what pageantry, what feats, what shows, what minstrelsy, and pretty din, the regent made in Mytilene to greet the king.” – Gower

Although modern scholars generally agree that Shakespeare only appears to have written the second half of the play, this newly invented term for an extravagant ceremonial display appears in the section definitively authored by the Bard.


18. Scuffle: Antony and Cleopatra, Act I, Scene I

    “His captain's heart, which in the scuffles of great fights hath burst the buckles on his breast, reneges all temper, and is become the bellows and the fan to cool a gipsy's lust.” – Philo

Another example of an existing verb that Shakespeare decided could stand up just as well as a noun.


19. Swagger: Henry V, Act II, Scene IV/A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act III, Scene I

    “An't please your majesty, a rascal that swaggered with me last night.” – Williams

    “What hempen home-spuns have we swaggering here, so near the cradle of the fairy queen?” – Puck

By transitive property, Shakespeare is responsible for Justin Bieber’s “swag.”


20. Uncomfortable: Romeo and Juliet, Act IV, Scene V

    “Despised, distressed, hated, martyr'd, kill'd! Uncomfortable time, why camest thou now to murder, murder our solemnity?” - Capulet




Un- was another prefix Shakespeare appended to adjectives with a liberal hand. In the case of Romeo and Juliet, a tragedy in which a father mourns his daughter’s suicide, “uncomfortable” seems to have originated with a slightly more drastic sense than how we use it now.

 


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Paper Art [via Nina Reznick]

Calvin Nicholls has worked for 25 years to perfect his medium of choice: PAPER

To make the art, he starts by observing real-life animals and their movements.





He takes numerous sketches that he will later use as reference for his paper art.  He then cuts up thousands of tiny pieces of paper and pastes them together to form each animal.

It’s delicate work. He uses X-ACTO knives, scalpels, and scissors in the construction of his critters. His work has been featured in National Geographic, as well as numerous galleries and art shows all over the world.




Calvin’s Facebook page and website.


Bolivia Salt Flats [Via cacciatore]

These salt flats in Bolivia are a natural wonder that are not only awe-inspiring, but also seem to be the best place to play with perspective. With reflections that play tricks on the eye and constant bright sunshine, Salar de Uyuni is a veritable dreamland for the photographer with a sense of humor.

Below, find out what happens when you have the perfect backdrop, good props and a group of people who have really thought this whole salt-flats-photo-shoot thing through:

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