Cajun Wit and Wisdom

An Interview with Ken Atchity

Humor & Health Journal


After reading your book, Cajun Household Wisdom, I wanted to do an interview with you. I found the book very humorous as well as informative. Through the sayings, photographs, and stories the reader gets a genuine glimpse and flavor of Cajun culture and a lot of laughs. What motivated you to write the book?

As I grew around my mother’s French Louisiana Family on a farm near Eunice I started collecting sayings and stories I heard from family members and other people in Louisiana. Especially the hunting stories and jokes my uncles told. I’ve always thought that the Cajuns have a unique way of looking at life and wanted to put it together in one place.

Let me mention some subjects and let you give an explanation of what they mean in Cajun culture.

Food

Cajuns are people who enjoy every moment of life. They aren’t city planners, architects, or engineers. They’re country people. Their thing is living in the moment. The greatest celebration of the moment on a daily basis is meals. Cajuns have an incredible zest about eating and putting their energy into food. They love texture, which is why they like spicy food and all kinds of food that has a lot of surface to it. Cajun philosophy center around the kitchen and around eating. As far as Cajuns are concerned, if you haven’t eaten with someone, you don’t know them.

Dance

Dancing is another example of living in the moment and celebrating life. What’s amazing when you go to Louisiana is that you see the oldest people dancing. People in there nineties will be out in the dance floor kicking up a storm. People of all ages go to the dance halls. So the dance hall is another place where Cajun culture comes together to celebrate the energy of life. One of the famous clubs is Fred’s in Mamou. If you walk in at 11 o’ clock on Saturday morning you’d find the place already hopping. The truth is that it’s all the people from the night before who are still there. Since there are no windows in the place no one has any idea or cares what time it is.

Coffee

Jokes, stories, and conversations are all a celebration of life and obviously the best place to do that is over a meal or a cup of coffee. Coffee is a central part of Cajuns culture. It’s a time to stop and talk. You don’t drink coffee while working.

Conversation

Cajuns like to talk and tell stories. One of my uncles in Louisiana still resents the telephone. He thinks that if people want to talk with you, they should drive over to your place. Then you’ll know it’s important and you’ll stop what you’re doing to have a talk.

As a kid I remember sitting on the front porch in rocking chairs and endlessly listening to my uncles, grandfather, and grandmother telling stories and talking. That’s what I go home to Louisiana for now. I need the fix- to be with people who know how to talk.

One time I went on a fishing trip with my Uncle Wib. We got up at three A.M. to go down to Grand Isle and we never stopped talking. We were supposed to get there by sunrise. At 10 o’clock I pointed that out. He said ‘Oh my God, I took the wrong road at Thibodaux five hours back.’ We were so deep in conversation that we forgot about everything else.

To Cajuns nothing is more important than communication. We get so busy in our modern world that we don’t really have time to talk with each other – everything is oriented toward efficiency and arranged in bytes. Just enough is said to get by. But to Cajuns talking is an art.

What is your next Cajun book?

It is similar to Cajun Household Wisdom except it’s about the kitchen and eating. It’s called Cajun Kitchen Wisdom and has recipes for smothered chicken, lima beans and lots more. It contains sayings that have to do with the kitchen. One is “If de gumbo is good, you can put up with de cook.’ It also presents fishing and farming stories. The thing about Cajun humor is that much of it is about fishing or farming stories. The White Mule stories are prime examples of farming tales.

One of my favorite White Mule stories will appear in the next book, Cajun Kitchen Wisdom.

It goes like this: A stranger walks into a bar in Abbeville and takes a seat. Halfway through his Jax, he pulls a huge tomato out of the paper bag he carried in, and sets it on the counter. The bartender sees him do it, but doesn’t even stop wiping his glasses. The man at the other end of the bar doesn’t come over either.

So the stranger asks, “Y’all see dis tomata?’

The other two men nod.

“Sacre blue du couyon,” the stranger says. “Have you ever seed a tomata as dis heah?’

The other two men move over politely to take a closer look. The man who was at the far stool lifts the tomato, palms it, smells it, rubs it, smells his finger, then puts it back on the bar. The bartender doesn’t even bother to do the same. He just exchanges glances with the other man.

“Well?’ demands the stranger.

‘Well, ah foh one siurley have,’ says the man from the other stool.

The stranger can’t believe his ears but the other man tells him to wait. He goes outside, then comes back in, straining as he carries the biggest, most gigantic tomato the stranger’s even seen in his life – it has to weigh over ten pounds! The man places the tomato on the counter, and the stranger can’t resist touching it, smelling it, stroking it’s skin. Sheepishly, he puts his tomato back into its bag.

“Okay,” he says to the man.

“You got ta tell me, yah. What is yo’ secret?”

“Did you see dat white mule tied up outside?” the other man asks.

“Yah, ah sawed it,” the stranger nods.

“Well it’s dat mule.” “Ah doan unnerstand,” says the stranger.

“Dere’s nuttin’ ta understand,” the other man explains.

“Everybod ‘roun heah knows about it” – he looks at the bartender, who nods for confirmation.

“When ah go out ta ready my ground for plantin’, dat white mule pulls mah plow. When ah’m plantin’, dat white mule pulls de cultivator- an’ when ah’m harvestin’ –“

“How much you recon’ you wan’ foh dat mule?” the other man breaks in.

“I had date mule foh ten years now,” the other man says. “Date mule’s not foh sale.”

“Ah’ll give you a hunnert dollars cash for dat mule raht now,” says the stranger, plunking the gold coins down on the counter.

The other man looks at the coins for a second. “A hunnert dollars?” he says.

“Sold!”

The stranger’s jubilant, but the man who sold the mule says, “Would you min’ if ah deliever him ta you in the mohnin? Dat mule was mah fren,’ and ah’d lake to let mah wife ‘n kids say good-bye to him properly.”

“No problem,” says the other man, and leaves the bar whistling.

But the first man got himself a real run of bad luck. First of all, he stays at the bar and gets caught in a bouree’ game- and lost the hundred dollars. Second of all, when he wakes up the next mroing, and went to his barn to get the mule ready to deliever he finds the mule dead as a doornail on the barn floor.

He felt real bad about that, real bad- especially because he didn’t have the hundred dollars to repay the stranger. But after awhile he got to thikin’ and realized that, as the saying goes, “a deal is a deal.” So he loaded the mule on his wagon, and headed for the other man’s farm. He parked the wagon down the road a bit and walked up to the house, where the man was waiting for him on his porch.

“I got some bad news for you, an’ some moh bad news,” the first man says.

“What’s de bad news?” asks the stranger.

“Well you ‘member dat hunnert dollars you gave me las’ night for det mule? Ah got mahself caught in a bouree’ game and ah done las de whole ting.”

“Well dat surely is bad news,” the stranger agreed. “Dat’s real bad news. Ah feel rela badly foh you, losing dat money, sha.”

“But the other bad news is dat the mule you bought – ah found him daid in mah barn dis nohnin.”

Now the stranger understood the gravity of the situation all too well, and why the first man felt so bad. But he got to thiking, and realized to himself, “a deal’s a deal.”

“Let me axe you a question, he finally said. “Whar is dat mule?”

The other man pointed down the road to the wagon. The stranger followed him so he could see for himself. After he was satisfied that it was the same mule he’d bought at the bar he helped the other man unload the mule.

“Jes’ leave him heah.” He said.

The first man said again how bad he felt about the whole thing, and drove off home with a heavy heart.

A few months went by before the first man had the nerve to go back to that bar in Abbeville for a Jax. But one night he did, and there was the stranger.

“Whar yo’ bin?” the sranger said. “I bin watchin’ foh you/”

“To tell ya de trewty. Ah felt so bad ‘bout losin dat money and dat mule dying an’ all, I didn’t have de noive ta see you again.”

“Doan feel bad no mod, the stranger said. “Ever’ting toined out okay.”

“Whatch you mean okay?”

“I held me a raffle and made me a good profit.”

“A raffle?”

The stranger nodded. “Yah, ah raffled off dat mule. Al sole me two hunnerty tickets foh one dollar each.”

“You raffled off dat daid mule, and you made two hunnert dollars?” The first man was amazed, “and you had all dose folds mad at you?”

“No,” the stranger smiled. “Jes’ one poison was mad yah. But ah gave him his money back!”

These are stories I love. They reflect the culture and the ingenuity of daily life. They say, “If you can find a simple way to do it, find a simple way to do it, find a Cajun and he’ll make it ten times more complicated and you’ll have a lot more fun along the way.”




Kenneth Agillard Atchity is the author of several books including Cajun Household Wisdom: You Know You Still Alive If It’s Costin’ You Money published by Longmeadow Press. At the time of this printing he’s somewhere between Breaux Bridge and Opelousas eating his way across his native state.

George Carlin, Eazy-E, Frank Zappa were MORMONS? [via Nina Reznick]

http://www.dangerousminds.net





If you don’t know it, the Mormon Church has a curious habit (tradition? doctrine? what would it be called?) of baptizing dead people as Mormons posthumously. This is the subject of a blog called Famous Dead Mormons (tag line = “Saved After Death, whether willing or not.”). Apparently baptizing famous people became a bit of a “fad” in the 1990s Think of it, perhaps, as a Mormon “prank.”

Believe if or not, infamously outspoken hater of religion George Carlin is now, that’s right, a Mormon in the afterlife. I’m sure this will be news to him. (Can you imagine his reaction to this???)

Name: GEORGE DENIS PATRICK CARLIN
Gender: Male
Birth: 12 May 1937 Manhattan, New York County, New York, United States
Death: 22 June 2008 Santa Monica, Los Angeles, California, United States

Individual Ordinances

Baptism Completed, 14 August 2010, Columbia South Carolina Temple

Confirmation Completed, 26 August 2010, Provo Utah Temple

Initiatory Completed, 8 September 2010, Jordan River Utah Temple

Endowment Ready

Mormon temples across America have also claimed The Breakfast Club director John Hughes, sportscaster Harry “Holy Cow!” Caray, Nancy Spungen, the great Welsh actor and drunk, Richard Burton, Frank Zappa, George Orwell and Truman Capote as their own. Here’s a jaw-dropper: dead rapper and drug dealer Eazy-E is now a Mormon, too. Hilarious!

Jewish groups were outraged to find that Adolf Hitler and Eva Braun appeared on LDS “genealogical” records. Heinrich Himmler’s name was also submitted for baptism. In 1995 an agreement was made to “un-baptize” 300,000 Jewish names, many of them Holocaust victims. In 2008, after he secured the Democratic Party’s nomination, President Barack Obama’s dead mother, Stanley Ann Dunham—who passed away in 1995—was baptized posthumously.







Dangerous Minds is a compendium of oddities, pop culture treasures, high weirdness, punk rock and politics drawn from the outer reaches of pop culture. Our editorial policy, such that it is, reflects the interests, whimsies and peculiarities of the individual writers. And sometimes it doesn't. Very often the idea is just "Here's what so and so said, take a look and see what you think." I'll repeat that: We're not necessarily endorsing everything you'll find here, we're merely saying "Here it is." We think human beings are very strange and often totally hilarious. We enjoy weird and inexplicable things very much. We believe things have to change and change swiftly. It's got to be about the common good or it's no good at all. We like to get suggestions of fun/serious things from our good-looking, high IQ readers. We are your favorite distraction.

Royal Wedding Vows Made Visible for the First Time

June 24, 2011 (MMD Newswire) -- When Prince William and Kate Middleton spoke their wedding vows before 2 billion people they might have been surprised to learn that a laboratory in the English Lake District was making their voices visible with a new type of scientific instrument. The voice patterns of Prince William and Kate Middleton, now the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, revealed some surprising results on the CymaScope, a device designed to make sound visible.

According to John Stuart Reid (CymaScope co-inventor with Erik Larson), Prince William and Kate Middleton's voice's have some interesting characteristics.

"The future King of England's voice pattern is based on the number twelve, an important number in the history of royalty, while the central feature is a crown-like hexagon. Her Royal Highness' voice pattern contains a seven-sided figure, a number associated with the seven virtues: Faith, Hope, Charity, Fortitude, Justice, Prudence, and Temperance."

(See additional notes on numerology at the end of this press release.)

The CymaScope allows normally invisible voice patterns to become visible, each as unique as a fingerprint. This new technology, which involves imprinting sounds on the surface tension of water, can be used in a variety of research areas. When used in phonology, the study of speech sounds, the research may lead to the development of successful therapies to support autistic and deaf children in their acquisition of speech and language.

The CymaScope permits the actual voice sounds of children and adults to be made visible and when the visual equivalent of vocal sounds or words can be created in real time it becomes possible for people to see the patterns of their own voices on a computer screen.

Some speech pathologists have suggested that voice pattern recognition by children could assist in the process of acquiring speech and language. Marsha Steinberger, M.A. CCC-SLP, a Speech-Language Pathologistbased in Las Vegas, USA, works with autistic children. "Since many children with autism are visual thinkers the CymaScope technology provides an ideal way to capitalize on their learning style. The visual feedback offered by this new instrument offers a real ray of hope to families with autistic children--if the child can see the sounds they are making it could greatly accelerate their ability to speak and acquire language. I plan on setting up a CymaScope study as soon as funding support is available. I would also like to conduct a study of people with brain injuries as it seems likely that the interactive and fun aspect of the CymaScope imagery will be a very stimulating and enjoyable experience for brain-injured patients and may well lead to improvements in brain function."

Significant strides have also been made with the CymaScope in a project that aims to decipher dolphin language. Dedicated marine biology researcher Jack Kassewitz, who heads the Florida team SpeakDolphin.com, has studied dolphins for a decade. "Thanks to the CymaScope it has at last been possible to get some idea of what the dolphin sees in its mind's eye when it uses its bio-sonar to look at an object. Holding a range of plastic objects in the water we captured the dolphin's sound echoes with a special microphone, which we imaged using the CymaScope. We were then able to see the general shapes of the objects, which look similar to the ultrasonography images seen in hospitals. This technology is allowing us to build a lexicon of dolphin words that will allow us to communicate with dolphins in their own language in the future."

Sound and vibration underpin all matter, so seeing the sounds that lie at the heart of matter helps to lift the veils that conceal many mysteries of the universe. The CymaScope represents the first scientific instrument that can give us a visual image of sound and vibration, helping us to understand our world and universe in ways previously hidden from view.An entirely new and exciting realm of exploration lies before us.

Main story ends.

Further notes on the numerological aspects of the Royal vows images:

John Stuart Reid commented: "His Royal Highness' voice pattern is based on the number twelve, a sacred number for many religions, including the royal Egyptian dynasties. The twelve plant-like motifs around the Duke's voice image resemble the lotus blossom, while the central hexagon is very crown like. A sun or star-like symbol inside the hexagon reminds us that in ancient times all kings were associated with the sun god.

Her Royal Highness' voice pattern contains 14 flower-like motifs, and ancient symbology suggests that the number 14 denotes someone with a vivid imagination, who is full of ideas, energy and vitality. The inner part of the pattern includes a seven-sided figure, a number associated with the seven virtues: Faith, Hope, Charity, Fortitude, Justice, Prudence, and Temperance."

The Kate & William "I Do" graphic is available to the general public via: http://www.cymascope.com/cyma_research/breakingnews.html

The image can be downloaded by the general public for a small donation to benefit Dolphin Research.

For hi res press images and further information, contact:

John Stuart Reid: (+44) 17687-79006

john@sonic-age.com

http://www.cymascope.com/cyma_research/

For more information on dolphin language research contact:

Jack Kassewitz: (+1) 305 807-5812

http://www.speakdolphin.com

For more information on autism and speech-language therapy contact:

Marsha Steinberger M.A., CCC-SLP (+1) 818 808-9418

marsha.steinberger@gmail.com



Copyright(C) 2009 Mass Media Distribution LLC: Press Release News Wire. Press Release Distribution Rights Reserved.

Mass Media Distribution LLC - 3350 Riverwood Pkwy Suite 1900 - Atlanta, Georgia 30339

You can't do anything about the length of your life, but you can do something about its width and depth.

Evan Esar
American Humorist (1899 - 1995)

ROMANCE 2011 [via David Angsten]

He grasped me firmly, but gently, just above my elbow and guided me into a room, his room.

Then he quietly shut the door and we were alone. He approached me soundlessly, from behind, and spoke in a low, reassuring voice close to my ear. "Just relax." Without warning, he reached down and I felt his strong, calloused hands start at my ankles, gently probing, and moving upward along my calves, slowly but steadily. My breath caught in my throat.


I knew I should be afraid, but somehow I didn't care. His touch was so experienced, so sure. When his hands moved up onto my thighs, I gave a slight shudder, and partly closed my eyes. My pulse was pounding. I felt his knowing fingers caress my abdomen, my ribcage.

And then, as he cupped my firm, full breasts in his hands, I inhaled sharply.

Probing, searching, knowing what he wanted, he brought his hands to my shoulders, slid them down my tingling spine and into my panties. Although I knew nothing about this man, I felt oddly trusting and expectant. This is a man, I thought...a man used to taking charge. A man not used to taking 'No' for an answer. A man who would tell me what he wanted. A man who would look into my soul and say.......


"Okay ma'am, you can board your flight now."


Encourage Creativity Through Storytelling

Written by: Royce Buckingham

Every child has the potential to be a creative storyteller, an important skill parents can nurture. As the children's fantasy author of "Demonkeeper," "Goblins" and the upcoming book "The Dead Boys," I have helped hundreds of students, and my own boys, bring their imaginations to life through stories. Below are some tips to try with your children. These are the same simple techniques that I use to create my own books, and they will make a tremendous difference in your child's storytelling.

I often hear that when children sit down to write a story they are blocked by the imposing wall that is the blank page. My deceptively simple solution: Take away the wall.

Draw on imagination

Children have active imaginations and a natural ability to make up stories. Just ask them this question: "What would you do if [fill in the blank] happened?" And watch them go. This is my first bit of advice — start with oral storytelling.

Help your child get the story straight in her or his head, share it and get feedback before writing a single word. This teaches the child at least four primary story development skills: outlining, finishing, seeking feedback and editing.

For oral storytelling, ask your son or daughter to think up a simple "What if [fill in the blank] happened?" Then invite the child to answer these three basic questions:
- What character would be the most fun to put in that situation?
- What is the character's problem?
- How does the character solve it in a creative way?

Encourage your child to try several different answers for each question and then pick her favorite. Feel free to contribute examples if the child gets stuck. As soon as the child answers these questions — voilá — it's a story.
Now ask for a different "What if...?" and repeat the process. Have your child create three of these oral stories, making it a fun game.

Tell the story out loud

After creating three stories, have your child pick a favorite story and tell it to as many people as possible, each time in three minutes or less. Allow your child to add details, change it and eliminate parts that don't sound right. The story may grow or tighten. The trick is to tell it over and over in three-minute increments and smooth it out orally.

As the story changes, your child is learning to edit. Yes, edit — that scary chore so many writers dread! Changes in oral stories, however, are natural and painless, since there's nothing to erase.

Have your child keep telling the story to others. When the story sounds right to the child and to the last person told, it is ready to write down.
This process usually takes me about three to six months (no joke). I don't write a single word until I know my story by heart. Of course, I don't recommend six months for a child. Just be sure to have the youngster tell the story enough times that the kinks are worked out and he can tell it smoothly so that it makes sense.

Now your child is ready to write ... one sentence.

Writing is the last step

Have your son or daughter jot down the story as a single sentence including only the three basics: the character, the problem, and what the character must do to solve it. For example:
When Billy, a first-grader, discovers his school has vanished, he must find it by following the clues left behind on the playground.

Your child will recognize when the written sentence is right, because she has told the story over and over. Now celebrate!

Once children can write compelling one-sentence stories, they graduate to a paragraph. If this goes well, move on to a one-page summary. And when they can describe a story in these abbreviated written forms, then have them try it as a short story. Small steps first. Novels later. And trust me, knowing the story first will make the writing part much easier for the child later.

Your child should stop at each stage to celebrate, share and receive feedback. Soon your son or daughter will have a great story and a great story-creation technique.

That's it. That's how I do it, and that's how I teach children to do it. It's a good way to prepare kids for school, it's free, and composing a great story together is a creative way to bond with your child.

Royce Buckingham is a children's book author. His next book, "The Dead Boys" (Penguin Putnam) debuts September 2010.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR EMMY® NOMINATED TEAM FOR THE KENNEDY DETAIL

OUTSTANDING HISTORICAL PROGRAMMING – LONG FORM

The Kennedy Detail

Discovery Channel

Executive Producers
Ken Atchity, Brooke Runnette, Chi‑Li Wong, Jay Renfroe,
David Garfinkle

Co‑Executive Producer
Vince DiPersio

Producers
Grant Axton, Gerald Blaine, Liza Maddrey, Lisa McCubbin


“©ATAS/NATAS”

Ancient City belonging to the white-skinned 'Cloud People' Chachapoyas discovered in Peru [via Nina Reznick]

dailymail.co.uk























An ancient Chachapoyas village located close to the area where the lost city was found




A lost city discovered deep in the Amazon rainforest could unlock the secrets of a legendary tribe.

Little is known about the Cloud People of Peru, an ancient, white-skinned civilisation wiped out by disease and war in the 16th century.

But now archaeologists have uncovered a fortified citadel in a remote mountainous area of Peru known for its isolated natural beauty.

It is thought this settlement may finally help historians unlock the secrets of the 'white warriors of the clouds'.

The tribe had white skin and blonde hair - features which intrigue historians, as there is no known European ancestry in the region, where most inhabitants are darker skinned.

The citadel is tucked away in one of the most far-flung areas of the Amazon. It sits at the edge of a chasm which the tribe may have used as a lookout to spy on enemies.



















The Chachapoyas, also called the Warriors of the Clouds, were an Andean people living in the cloud forests of the Amazonian region of present-day Peru



The main encampment is made up of circular stone houses overgrown by jungle over 12 acres, according to archaeologist Benedict Goicochea Perez.
Rock paintings cover some of the fortifications and next to the dwellings are platforms believed to have been used to grind seeds and plants for food and medicine.

The Cloud People once commanded a vast kingdom stretching across the Andes to the fringes of Peru's northern Amazon jungle, before it was conquered by the Incas.



Read More
An editor becomes kind of your mother. You expect love and encouragement from an editor.--Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

YOGA GIVES BACK - June Newsletter

SUCCESS STORY: Deenabandhu, Karnataka, India

View NISHTHAYGB's direct funding program "Sister Aid" is sponsoring 56 impoverished mothers, children and orphans for their education, vocational training and micro credit programs.

Because of your continued support, YGB now sponsors one more girl Shyamala, 16 years old and orphaned, who has lived at Deenbandhu Trust Home for the past ten years. Here is a little background on Shyamala; Shyamala, the oldest girl at the home, is soft-spoken and quiet natured. She takes responsibility for younger children at the home. She likes to sing, tailor and stitch bags and torn cloths. Shyamala’s mother, Mahadevamma, had married a man who was already married. He left her after Shyamala was born. She survived for a couple of years as a homeless woman with Shyamala. Eventually, they joined Shakthidhama, a rehabilitation center for women in Mysore. One day, Mahadevamma disappeared, leaving behind Shyamala who was about six years old. Shyamala was then placed with a couple at B.R. Hills and later admitted to Deenabandhu Girls’ home for further education and rehabilitation.”

It is our true joy and honor to be able to extend our support to Shyamala as she starts her college education this year- against all odds!!!

View NISHTHA

Puttama and Radha, who received sawing machines donated by YGB in February, have been trained to become a professional seamstress. They are now paid to make 40 mosquito nets for children as well as learning to saw children's dresses. Deenabandhu is also helping them to start to build small business for them to stitch petty coats in great demand in the local markets. In the next six months, they will be able to earn significant income. They will also become great example of economic independence for the younger girls at Deenbandhu.

View NISHTHAThese updates and photographs are regularly sent by Professor Jayadev, the founder and director of Deenabandhu Trust Home.

Watch our new video “Sister Aid 2: Deenabandhu” on YGB’s YouTube Channel!!!


Exciting News! YGB’s first global fundraiser “Thank You Mother India” Update

View NISHTHA
"Click this logo to register"


Yoga Magazine offers free ads for all the yoga studios and sponsors!!

Go to Jorgen's WebsiteRegister for "Thank You Mother India" by July 10th at TYMI to host or sponsor this event. Yoga Magazine will feature this event with free ads of the hosting studios and sponsors in the September issue with your logo and website link.

Hosting studios and sponsors confirmed for this special event include; Jorgen Christianson (Omkar 108 Yoga), Eddie Stern (Ashtanga Yoga New York), Kino MacGregor (Yogamala-Hong Kong, Miami Life Center), Sophie Herbert (Yoga Sutra), and many more from London, Rio de Janeiro, Hong Kong, Tokyo...etc. Join us!!

Yoga Magazine features YGB on June issue as well as hosting a “Charity Class” every Saturday, at Wholefoods, Kensington, London.

Video Campaign Launched!

View NISHTHASend your video clip to info@yogagivesback.org. Next one will be out in July. Thanks for a great editing work by Ting Poo.
"Click this 1 minute PR video"


Welcome YGB Ambassador Go to TYMI Web PageChaz!!

Chaz Russ ((E-RYT-500, T-500) has been a dedicated supporter for YGB, hosting a very successful fundraiser for YGB at Yoga Works Tarzana with Cosmic Kirtan Band this spring. Chaz---"As the founder and former owner of Sisters Yoga, an all-female yoga studio in Fresno, CA., it seemed only natural for me to join the YGB team. When founding Sisters Yoga, my aim was to create a space where female Spirits of all ages could come together in community, tend to the gardens of their self-esteem and empower themselves through the self-discovery and strength building practices of yoga. There's a divine power in sisterhood, and that power is felt amidst sisters of all ages, backgrounds and economic status. We feel our deep rooted connection through the practice of yoga. For the 7 years I've been teaching and the 17 years I've been practicing, I continue to be reminded of the beaming light that shines so brightly within us all. Equally, if someone thousands of miles away suffers, so I suffer. But if I can help and make a difference here in LA, for instance, by raising awareness and money for our sisters in India , then the consciousness of LA is raised and we benefit equally.

Every woman deserves a shot to reach her God-given dharmic potential. I'm honored to be a part of the YGB team, as YGB provides the opportunity for women in India to tend to the gardens of their heart's entrepeneurial yearnings and therefore, support themselves, their families and villages in the long run. Such big impacts can be made with small monetary contributions. Some of the biggest leaps in evolution and healing are made with the smallest of steps. I look forward to continue to host yoga classes in LA for YGB and our sisters in India."


New Partners!

Deenabandhu Green Home for GirlsMindBodyGreen.com, online go-to-guide for yoga and wellness, has chosen YGB as one of the six non profits to receive 20% of their online directory sales.

"MindBodyGreen.com supports Yoga Gives Back because we love that they're changing the lives of women suffering in India by giving them tools that will improve their lives dramatically -- tools that will last a lifetime..."



Yoga 360C Pur
Founded in New York by Simon Grunberger, C pur works to make innovative yoga products that will inspire customers to immerse themselves in their practice.

“As a young company dedicated to the transformative power of yoga, C pur is proud to be partnered with Yoga Gives Back. By contributing our efforts to awareness campaigns, event planning, and donations from online sales, our partnership with Yoga Gives Back is our way of expressing gratitude for the power of yoga to change us not just as individuals, but as a global community.”


Upcoming Events!

YGB Relay

YGB virtual torches are passing through the global yoga community.

Yoga Flex FlyerY2Y Yoga, Charlotte, NC

July 3rd, Sunday, 2:15 PM; Hot Class with Tanner Bazermore, a special charity class to support YGB.



Water Brazillian Yoga and PilatesMOKSHA Festival, Santa Monica College

August 13-14, Visit YGB booth at this first MOKSHA Festival in LA, presented by YogiLoka.com and LA Yoga & Ayurveda Magazine. It is a two-day celebration of wellness, spiritual expansion and conscious living through: Yoga, Ayurveda, Sacred Music and healthy food. It is an opportunity to celebrate old friendships and build new ones with like-minded people and businesses. Join us!!

*Check www.yogagivesback.org for more upcoming events and details.


RECENT EVENTS + APPRECIATION


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"OM Mani Padme Hum", Yoga Flex, Charlotte, NC

Two Sundays on May 15th, and 22nd, taught by Mara, Dena and Shari raised over 2000 dollars. Amazing YGB debut in Charlotte thanks to Yoga Flex and its powerful community. Thank you Dena and everyone at Yoga Flex community!!


"Sister Aid" special class, At Water Brazilian Yoga & Pilates, LA

Sunday, May 22nd, Liz McDonald and Stefani Manger taught a special afternoon class. C-Pur donated generous Indian lunch for all.


Karma Flow Day @ Kansas Siddhi Yoga, Kansas City

June 1st, proceeds from three classes offered by Gina Caputo, Laura Williamson and Shari.


Santa Monica Yoga 10th Anniversary, CA

Saturday, June 4th: Kyra Hagland's special class, DJ Drez live music and amazing raffle items coordinated by the owner Bruce Bair and Janet Pequette raised over 1500 dollars for YGB. Many thanks for SM Yoga community.


Rock-n-Roll Sanskrit with Shari Goodhartz, Black Dog Yoga, Sherman Oaks, CA

Sunday, June 12, Shari taught a special fun class, hosted by long time YGB supporter Peter Barnett and Rose Gresch at Black Dog Yoga.


Thank you for your support, which is making a difference one event at a time!!